Making the threat of Huntington’s disease ‘small stuff’

1505
To reduce anxiety about the threat of Huntington’s disease, I start each day with a deep breathing exercise and meditation.
I started developing this practice in late 1997, two years after learning of my mother’s diagnosis for HD and the devastating fact that I had a 50-50 chance of inheriting the mutated gene. After many months struggling with worry and denial, I had hit rock bottom emotionally. (I eventually tested positive for the HD mutation.)
Browsing at titles in a bookstore – bookstores mattered a lot more before the e-book explosion – I came across Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff… and it’s all small stuff: Simple Ways to Keep the Little Things from Taking Over Your Life, a bestseller by the late Richard Carlson, Ph.D.
Over the next few months, I studied the book’s 100 brief chapters, each prescribing how to achieve calm in our harried world. Some might consider self-help books shallow, but I found this one to have a core of wisdom.
Chapter 1, “Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff,” lays out Dr. Carlson’s basic philosophy, a combination of Judeo-Christian fraternal love with a Buddhist de-emphasis of the desire for material success.
“Often we allow ourselves to get all worked up about things that, upon closer examination, aren’t really that big a deal,” Dr. Carlson wrote. “We focus on little problems and blow them way out of proportion…. So many people spend so much of their life energy ‘sweating the small stuff’ that they completely lose touch with the magic and beauty of life. When you commit to working toward this goal you will find that you will have far more energy to be kinder and gentler.”
Getting calm with deep inhalation
Chapter 63, “Count to Ten,” was pivotal for me.
“When you feel yourself getting angry, take a long, deep inhalation, and as you do so, say the number one to yourself,” Dr. Carlson suggested. “Then, relax your entire body as you breathe out. Repeat the same process with the number two, all the way through at least ten (if you’re really angry, continue to twenty-five).”
The deep breathing “clears your mind with a mini version of a meditation exercise,” he explained. It increases the oxygen in your lungs, reduces anger, and provides perspective, making “big stuff” look like “little stuff.
With time I settled on 20 deep breaths for every morning, followed by a few minutes of quiet relaxation. I usually sit in a lotus position on a carpet or on the edge of a chair or couch with my back arched forward to get the air as deeply into my lungs as possible.
When family or work obligations occasionally make it impossible to meditate at home, I do my breathing while driving or in airports.
When I don’t meditate, my day almost always becomes more stressful, sometimes even sad.
The breathing provides a powerfully calming effect. I feel that I’m doing something good for my brain by increasing the oxygen. By reducing my overall stress level, I hope, I can help delay the onset of HD symptoms.
In the video below, you can watch the demonstration of the technique I gave at the start of my keynote speech at the 2011 HD Therapeutics Conference, sponsored by the CHDI Foundation, Inc., in Palm Springs, CA. Other members of the HD community as well as caregivers and counselors engage in or recommend similar exercises, and a vast bibliography exists on yoga and meditation techniques. The principles here can apply for everybody in any aspect of life.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email