‘Navigating’ the Huntington’s disease community towards crucial clinical trials

As scientists and drug companies expand the array of potential treatments for Huntington’s disease, the Huntington Study Group (HSG), the world’s largest HD clinical research network, is redoubling its efforts to educate the HD community for current and upcoming clinical trials and train the necessary medical personnel.

A record 700-plus participants focused on these themes at the 26th annual HSG Meeting, titled “HSG 2019: Navigating HD,” November 7-9 at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Sacramento, CA. (Attendance at the HSG 2017 and 2018 meetings was over 600.)

Clinical trials are crucial for demonstrating drug safety and efficacy. The number of HD trials has increased in recent years, bringing hope for better treatment of the devastating symptoms and perhaps even an attack on the root causes. Key trials in progress include GENERATION HD1, run by Roche, and SIGNAL, administered by the HSG and Vaccinex.

“Figuring out how these trials are going to work, what they’re aiming to do, and what an individual patient or family should do to get involved or not get involved has become complicated, to some extent,” Andrew Feigin, M.D., the HSG chair and a professor of neurology at New York University Langone Health, told me in a November 6 interview. “That’s my interpretation of the ‘navigating HD.’ We’re trying to get at some of these novel therapies and clarify where they’re headed, where they stand, how the HSG can get more involved, and figuring out where people can go for the cutting-edge therapies for Huntington’s disease.”

In the conference-opening “HSG State of the Union” presentation by HSG leaders and staff, executive director Shari Kinel, J.D., reported that the event involved 15 countries, 23 companies, 9 advocacy groups, 17 sponsors, and 15 exhibitors. The sponsors included Roche’s American subsidiary Genentech and Vaccinex.

“This incredible showing […] is a sign that the HSG has more partners, more colleagues, more friends than ever who are engaged, dedicated, and committed to seeking treatments that make a difference for those impacted by Huntington’s disease,” Kinel told the audience.

Dr. Feigin affirmed that in the past year, the HSG has doubled its paid staff from four to eight, plus one part-timer, although he declined to reveal the organization’s annual budget. Headquartered in Rochester, NY, the HSG is mainly funded by firms like Vaccinex that it partners with on clinical trials, he explained. Sponsors cover the cost of the annual meeting.

… READ MORE

Source: At Risk for Huntington’s Disease

17 Condivisioni