ANNEXON EXPANDS CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PLATFORM INTO NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES OF THE BRAIN WITH INITIATION OF HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE CLINICAL PROGRAM

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Nov. 12, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Annexon, Inc. (“Annexon”) (Nasdaq: ANNX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing a pipeline of novel therapies for patients with classical complement-mediated disorders of the brain, body and eye, today announced that it has initiated a Phase 2 study, dosing the first patient with its full-length monoclonal antibody ANX005 in Huntington’s Disease (HD). The Phase 2 trial in HD expands Annexon’s classical complement platform into neurodegenerative diseases of the brain and highlights the pioneering research of the company’s co-founder, the late Dr. Ben Barres, former member of the National Academy of Sciences and Chair of Neurobiology, Stanford University. Aberrant activation of C1q plays a significant role in the neurodegenerative process by causing synapse loss, chronic neuroinflammation and eventual neuronal death.

“Huntington’s Disease is a devastating, progressive movement disorder with no cure and no approved therapeutic options available to patients and their families,” commented Sanjay Keswani, MBBS, BSc, FRCP, Chief Medical Officer of Annexon. “In neurodegenerative conditions like HD, our goal is to disrupt the disease course by inhibiting harmful classical complement activity, including synapse loss, that leads to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. We are excited to advance ANX005 and look forward to initial results from our Phase 2 trial in the second half of 2021.”

“Annexon targets the initiating protein of the classical complement pathway, C1q, which uniquely binds to synapses in the brain and appears to cause inappropriate synapse elimination during chronic neurodegenerative disease, such as HD,” stated Beth Stevens, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology, Children’s Hospital Boston and former postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Barres’ lab. “Inhibiting C1q and protecting functioning synapses may benefit patients with neurodegenerative conditions.”

READ MORE

Source:  Annexon Inc




0 Condivisioni